Speakers

{tab 23 April 2016|mystyle2}

Saturday 23 April 2016

7:00 am - 8:45 am

Registration

CDI Workshop:
9:00 am - 4:00 pm

*Earn 13 HRS of AHIMA CEs for Biannual Requirements




*All participants will receive a FREE AHIMA membership for 1 year

 

Clinical Documentation Improvement (CDI) Training for Physicians, Clinical Leaders and Managers

Ms. Deborah K. Green,
(Moderator),
Executive Vice President/Chief Innovation,
Global Services Officer,
AHIMA,
USA
Dr. Wilbur Lo,
Consultant, Speaker & Trainer,
AHIMA,
USA

In conjunction with the C3Summit, a 2-day training program is being offered for physicians, leaders and managers in healthcare institutions to provide a foundation to clinical documentation principles and practices. Specific, complete and reliable documentation is critical to providing safe, quality care for individual patients and to supporting national initiatives for quality measurement and quality improvement.

This highly interactive program provides a comprehensive overview of CDI principles and practices and relies heavily on case studies to enable prompt practice application. The lead trainer for this workshop is Wilbur Lo, MD who is additionally credentialed by AHIMA as a Certified Documentation Improvement Practitioner (CDIP). Dr. Lo also consults with hospitals and clinics in the design and implementation of CDI programs. Dr. Lo will be assisted by Deborah Green, MBA, RHIA, Executive Vice President of AHIMA and an HIM and HIT professional.

The program is two days in length and has been approved for 13 hours of AHIMA Continuing Education Credits for individuals participating throughout the two days.

Quality clinical documentation contributes to:

  • Safer and higher quality care
  • Integrity of data and information prior to, during and after migration from paper to electronic records, more complete and specific clinical coding, which enables more accurate assignment to risk-adjusted classifications, such as DRGs
  • More accurate physician and healthcare institution profiling
  • More accurate reflection of severity of illness and support for intensity of service, and length of stay
  • More reliable information for business and clinical analytics
  • More trustworthy information to support research, best practices, quality initiatives, and improved health of populations


Agenda Overview:

General CDI Topics Documentation Factors by Body System or Clinical Practice Area
About the Training

Introduction to CDI

Quality Clinical Documentation

CDI Program Guidelines

Record Content and Formats

Electronic Record Migration

CDI and Technology Solutions
Integumentary

Sensory

Respiratory

Cardiovascular

Digestive

Urinary

Endocrine

Blood, Lymphatic, Immune
Infectious & Parasitic Diseases

Musculoskeletal

Nervous

Reproductive

Behavioral Health

Pediatric

Neoplasms

Surgical Procedures


Who Should Attend:

Physicians: Medical Staff Department Heads, Program Chiefs, Chief of Quality, Chief of Accreditation, Staff Physicians, others as determined appropriate by the Healthcare Institution

Non-Physicians: As appropriate, leaders and/or managers of Education, Quality, Accreditation, Utilization Management, Risk Management, Patient Safety, Medical or Clinical Audit, HIM/Medical Records, Coding, Bed Management, Case Management, Others as determined appropriate by the Healthcare Institution

 
{tab 24 April 2016|mystyle2}

Sunday 24 April 2016

7:00 am - 8:45 am

Registration

CDI Workshop:
9:00 am - 4:00 pm

*Earn 13 HRS of AHIMA CEs for Biannual Requirements




*All participants will receive a FREE AHIMA membership for 1 year

 

Clinical Documentation Improvement (CDI) Training for Physicians, Clinical Leaders and Managers

Ms. Deborah K. Green,
(Moderator),
Executive Vice President/Chief Innovation,
Global Services Officer,
AHIMA,
USA
Dr. Wilbur Lo,
Consultant, Speaker & Trainer,
AHIMA,
USA

In conjunction with the C3Summit, a 2-day training program is being offered for physicians, leaders and managers in healthcare institutions to provide a foundation to clinical documentation principles and practices. Specific, complete and reliable documentation is critical to providing safe, quality care for individual patients and to supporting national initiatives for quality measurement and quality improvement.

This highly interactive program provides a comprehensive overview of CDI principles and practices and relies heavily on case studies to enable prompt practice application. The lead trainer for this workshop is Wilbur Lo, MD who is additionally credentialed by AHIMA as a Certified Documentation Improvement Practitioner (CDIP). Dr. Lo also consults with hospitals and clinics in the design and implementation of CDI programs. Dr. Lo will be assisted by Deborah Green, MBA, RHIA, Executive Vice President of AHIMA and an HIM and HIT professional.

The program is two days in length and has been approved for 13 hours of AHIMA Continuing Education Credits for individuals participating throughout the two days.

Quality clinical documentation contributes to:

  • Safer and higher quality care
  • Integrity of data and information prior to, during and after migration from paper to electronic records, more complete and specific clinical coding, which enables more accurate assignment to risk-adjusted classifications, such as DRGs
  • More accurate physician and healthcare institution profiling
  • More accurate reflection of severity of illness and support for intensity of service, and length of stay
  • More reliable information for business and clinical analytics
  • More trustworthy information to support research, best practices, quality initiatives, and improved health of populations


Agenda Overview:

General CDI Topics Documentation Factors by Body System or Clinical Practice Area
About the Training

Introduction to CDI

Quality Clinical Documentation

CDI Program Guidelines

Record Content and Formats

Electronic Record Migration

CDI and Technology Solutions
Integumentary

Sensory

Respiratory

Cardiovascular

Digestive

Urinary

Endocrine

Blood, Lymphatic, Immune
Infectious & Parasitic Diseases

Musculoskeletal

Nervous

Reproductive

Behavioral Health

Pediatric

Neoplasms

Surgical Procedures


Who Should Attend:

Physicians: Medical Staff Department Heads, Program Chiefs, Chief of Quality, Chief of Accreditation, Staff Physicians, others as determined appropriate by the Healthcare Institution

Non-Physicians: As appropriate, leaders and/or managers of Education, Quality, Accreditation, Utilization Management, Risk Management, Patient Safety, Medical or Clinical Audit, HIM/Medical Records, Coding, Bed Management, Case Management, Others as determined appropriate by the Healthcare Institution

Nursing Workshop:
9:00 am - 12:00 pm




The Role of Nursing in Enhancing Patient Quality and Safety Through Best Practices and Evidence-Based Care

Ms. Hanan Hamdan Alshehri,
(Moderator),
Director of Internship,
Nursing College,
Princess Nourahbint Abdulrahman University,
KSA
Dr. Wireen Le Datro,
(Moderator),
Director of Research,
Nursing College,
Princess Nourahbint Abdulrahman University,
KSA
Dr. Samantha Ismaile,
(Main Speaker),
Director of Nursing Program,
Assistant Professor,
Princess Nourah bint Abdulrahman University,
KSA
Ms. Mari Lou Prado-Inzerillo, M.A., R.N.,
Director, Nursing Operations and Credentialing,
Corporate Nursing,
New York-Presbyterian Hospital,
USA

Guidelines adherence among nurses and allied health professionals is the basis of patient care. Guidelines are used to enhance quality of care delivery and promote patient safety through evidence-based practice. Guidelines standardize clinical interventions by which nurses including Allied Health Professionals (AHP) are accountable for. Despite the fact that the development of clinical guidelines has evolved in medicine, nurses and midwives are becoming more interested in the use of guidelines as one means of facilitating evidence- based practice and ensuring higher quality care. Although nurses are increasingly using clinical guidelines to ensure quality of patient care, this remains to be a challenge. Evidence indicates that compliance utilizing clinical guidelines varies resulting in the possibility of harm to patients. It is therefore important to understand the underlying factors promoting and inhibiting guideline adherence in the nursing profession. A theoretical approach can help target interventions for specific barriers. A presentation of evidence- based, best practices will be provided.

END OF DAY
{tab 25 April 2016|mystyle2}

AGENDA WORKSHOPS/ABSTRACTS & OPENING CEREMONY PROGRAM - Monday 25 April 2016

7:00 am - 8:45 am

Registration

Workshop #1
9:00 am - 10:30 am




 

Johns Hopkins Aramco Healthcare: Leveraging the Strength of Partnership

Dr. John A. Ulatowski,
(Moderator),
Interim CEO,
Johns Hopkins Aramco Healthcare Company,
KSA;
Vice President and Executive Medical Director,
Johns Hopkins Medicine International,
USA
Dr. Samir Musleh,
Consultant Internal Medicine
Johns Hopkins Aramco Healthcare Company,
KSA
“Developing Local Talent for Patient Safety and Quality: Leveraging an Established Partner”
Dr. Asad Latif,
Assistant Professor
Johns Hopkins Anesthesiology/CCM Armstrong Institute,
USA
“Translating Quality Across Time, Space and Culture:
Globalization of Process Change and Outcomes in Patient Safety”
Dr. Ayse Gurses,
Associate Professor
Johns Hopkins Anesthesiology/CCM
Armstrong Institute,
USA
“Patient Safety 2.0: Using Human Factors Engineering to Improve Health Care”
Mr. Val Jovevski,
Global Healthcare Director,
Honeywell Building Solutions
UAE
"Leveraging Technology and Infrastructure to Optimize Patient Processes and Increase Safety Efficiencies"  

The objective of this workshop is to identify collaborative opportunities and disciplines within and across organizations. Changing a hospital's patient safety climate is critical for decreasing errors and providing optimal patient care. For these reasons, healthcare organizations in Saudi Arabia have been actively pursuing efforts to improve quality and safety of patient healthcare services. Building capacity is enhanced by structured education and ongoing development of expertise in the workforce Transferring this knowledge to other lands and cultures can experience local challenges but offers scalability and rapid dissemination. We can magnify our learning in healthcare by merging lessons learned from other disciplines especially concepts in engineering. A deliberate and coordinated approach with formal teaching, process enhancement and system support, fosters the sustainable culture for “the science of safety”.

BREAK: 10:30 am -10:45 am

Workshop #2
10:45 am - 12:15 pm



Demystifying Healthcare Infrastructure Projects

Mr. Stephen P. Nash
(Moderator),
Partner,
Co-Leader,
International Healthcare Practice Group,
Squire Patton Boggs,
USA
Mr. James Duckworth,
Partner,
Global Infrastructure Practice Group,
London Offices,
Squire Patton Boggs,
UK
Mr. Abraham Akkawi,
Transaction Advisory Services,
Government and Public Sector Leader,
Ernst & Young,
UAE
Mr. Edward Johnson,
Partner,
Global Infrastructure Practice Group,
London Offices,
Squire Patton Boggs,
UK
Mr. Andrea Longhi,
Partner,
MENA Advisory Leader,
Healthcare and Life Sciences,
Ernst & Young,
UAE

Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) are becoming increasingly prevalent as a means of providing private sector investment and expertise working in partnership with Governments to deliver public services. In the Middle East a number of countries are establishing legislative frameworks for PPPs. So far in Saudi Arabia however, PPPs have been implemented on an ad-hoc basis with no formal strategic framework to deliver healthcare policy objectives. The aim of this workshop will be to demystify PPPs and to explore how their use can help to address the long-term issues facing healthcare in Saudi Arabia. We will discuss the potential for PPPs to deliver world-class healthcare infrastructure and clinical services together with the different approaches to policy and legislative

OPENING CEREMONY RECEPTION 12:15 pm -1:30 pm

OPENING CEREMONY PROGRAM - Monday 25 April 2016

The National Anthem
Recitation from the Holy Quran

1:30 pm – 1:35 pm

Welcoming remarks by the Organizers: XS Conferences & Exhibitions and C3 International

Mr. Adel A. Shakoor,
President,
XS Conferences & Exhibitions

Mr. Ransel N. Potter,
Founder & Managing Partner,
C3 Summit International

1:35 pm – 1:40 pm

Remarks by: Ms. Paige Peterson
Executive Vice President, Huntsman Cancer Foundation
Member of Board of Directors,
National Council on U.S. Arab Relations

1:40 pm – 1:45 pm

Remarks by the Global Healthcare Partner
Mr. Hassan Al-Damluji,
Head Middle East Relations,
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

1:45 pm – 1:50 pm

Remarks by the Private Healthcare Partner
Dr. John A. Ulawtowski,
Chief Executive Officer,
Johns Hopkins Aramco Healthcare Company

1:50 pm – 1:55 pm

Remarks by the Academic Partner
H.E. Prof. Badran A. Al-Omar
Rector of King Saud University

1:55 pm – 2:00 pm

Remarks and Film introduction by Main Partner:
Mr. Osman Minkara
Managing Director
Aldara Medical Corporation

2:00 pm – 2:10 pm

Remarks by:
Mr. Joseph W. Westphal,
U.S. Ambassador, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

2:10 pm – 2:15 pm

Opening Statement by:
H.E. Eng. Khalid bin Abdulaziz Al-Falih
Minister of Health, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

2:15 pm – 2:20 pm

Honoring the Sponsors by:
HRH Prince Faisal bin Bandar Al Saud,
Governor of Riyadh Region, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

2:20 pm – 2:35 pm

Luncheon

2:35 pm


Workshop #3
3:00 pm - 4:30 pm











Improving Medical Tourism Partnerships Between Saudi Arabia and the USA to Provide Access to 'Best in Class' Healthcare Services for Better Population Health

Mr. Jonathan Edelheit,
(Moderator),
CEO,
Medical Tourism Association,
USA
Mr. Lance K. Barnes,
Director,
International & Strategic Services Development,
Indiana University Health International Patient Services,
Indiana University Health,
USA
Mr. Wayne Keathley,
Chief Executive Officer,
Baylor Global Health;
Associate Dean,
Dept. of Medicine,
Baylor College of Medicine,
USA
Mr. Jai Verma,
Managing Director,
Global Business to Govt (B2G),
Market Lead for KSA & North Africa,
Cigna
Dr. Sarper Tanli,
Vice President,
Houston Methodist Global Health Care Services EMEA,
UAE

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has given high priority to the development of health care services at all levels. For this reason, the new models of healthcare partnership, affiliations, training, capacity building and strategic partnership are changing. The global growth in the flow of patients and health professionals as well as medical technology, capital funding and regulatory practices in Saudi Arabia has given rise to new patterns of consumption and production of healthcare services over recent decades. A significant new element of a growing trade in healthcare has involved the movement of patients to Saudi Arabia in the pursuit of medical treatment and health; a phenomenon commonly termed 'medical tourism' which occurs when consumers elect to travel across international borders with the intention of receiving some form of medical treatment. This treatment often spans the full range of medical services. Learn how these new models will foster physician exchange and patient mobility, both inbound and outbound, between the USA and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, with the outcome being healthcare access that can improve the general health of the individual patient and the general population.

BREAK: 4:30 pm – 4:40 pm

Workshop #4
4:40 pm - 6:10 pm



Building the Health Information Workforce to Support Healthcare Innovation in Saudi Arabia

Ms. Deborah K. Green,
(Moderator),
Executive Vice President/Chief Innovation,
Global Services Officer,
AHIMA,
USA
Dr. Wilbur Lo,
Consultant, Speaker & Trainer,
AHIMA,
USA

Transforming healthcare requires innovation. To innovate, we must do things differently and smarter than we do them today. Innovation requires that we anticipate the changing competencies required of the workforce not only in direct patient care, but for those involved in the creation and handling of the data and information foundational to quality, safe patient care. This 90-minute workshop, led by AHIMA’s Chief Innovation and Global Services Officer, Ms. Deborah Green, will explore current and evolving roles needed across the spectrum of health data and information creation and use. Ms. Green will be joined by Dr. Wilbur Lo, AHIMA’s physician expert in clinical documentation requirements.

From capture, to quality control, to effective implementation and use of systems and technology, to exchange, to use in research, and on throughout its life, the drivers of healthcare transformation will compel the need for a re-defined workforce supporting every aspect of health information. The workshop discussion will touch on implications for evolving competencies in a wide range of areas.

END OF DAY
{tab 26 April 2016|mystyle2}

AGENDA TOPICS/ABSTRACTS - Tuesday 26 April 2016

Panel #1
8:30 am – 9:30 am








Understanding the Inherent Challenges of Social Healthcare: From Child Development to Mental Illness

Dr. Alanoud Bin Khethaila,
(Moderator),
Post Doctorate Fellow, Epidemiology,
King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre,
KSA
Dr. Yasmin Altwaijri,
Senior Scientist & Head,
Epidemiology,
King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre,
KSA
Dr. Mishael Al-Saud,
Associate Clinical Scientist,
Speech Language Pathology,
King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre,
KSA
Dr. Hesham Hamouda,
Assistant Professor,
Pediatric Psychiatry,
Harvard Medical School,
USA
Dr. Mark Beatty,
Division of Global Health Protection, Center for Global Health,
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
USA
Mr. David A. Stuart,
Managing Director,
International Markets, EMEA,
InTouch Health,
USA

Given the prevalence of mental health and substance-dependence problems in adults and children, it is not surprising that there is an enormous emotional as well as a tremendous financial burden on individuals, their families and society as a whole. The economic impacts of mental illness affect personal income, the ability of ill persons – and often their caregivers –to work, productivity in the workplace and contributions to the national economy, as well as the utilization of treatment and support services. The cost of mental health problems in developed countries is estimated to be between 3% and 4% of a country’s GNP. However, mental disorders cost national economies several billion dollars, both in terms of expenditures incurred and loss of productivity. The average annual costs, including medical, pharmaceutical and disability costs, for employees with depression may be 4.2 times higher than those incurred by a typical beneficiary. However, the cost of treatment is often completely offset by the personal impact on all ages and at all stages of mental illness. As many as 450 million people suffer from a mental or behavioral disorder; 1 million commit suicide every year; one in four families has at least one member with a mental disorder; four of the six leading causes of years lived with a mental disorder are due to neuropsychiatric disorders (depression, trauma, alcohol-use disorders, schizophrenia and bipolar).

BREAK: 9:30 am – 9:40 am

Panel #2
9:40 am – 10:40 am












 

Healthcare Start-Ups, Challenges and Opportunities

Dr. Mazen Hassanain,
(Moderator),
Associate Professor,
King Saud University,
KSA
Mr. Osman Minkara,
Managing Director,
Aldara Medical Corporation
 
Mr. Foad Alfarhan,
Co-founder,
Junnah,
Rawaq & Maharah,
KSA
Mr. Rakan Aleidi,
Managing Director,
Endeavor,
KSA
Mr. Wael Kabli,
Healthcare Start-Ups,
Challenges and Opportunities,
Cura Healthcare,
KSA
 
Ms. Aisha Y. Salem,
Intellectual Property Attaché, MENA,
U.S. Embassy Kuwait,
U.S. Patent & Trademark Office,
U.S. Department of Commerce,
USA

The millennial generation is leveraging technology in every aspect of modern life. Also, we can see the recent attention by institutions supporting the start-up business in Saudi Arabia to close the technology gap and enhance economic diversity. With the ongoing challenge of meeting expectations in healthcare and the pressure on the economy, nurturing innovation in small and medium business is a top priority. It is pivotal to participate in the economic transformation the country going through. It is the medium for innovation and main creator of jobs. It is associated with economic growth and cultivate human capital.

Our aim is to discuss the ecosystem for start-ups with focus on healthcare business. What are the differences causing the discrepancies between healthcare and other start-ups? What are the barriers to start-ups culture penetration to healthcare industry?

BREAK: 10:40 am – 10:50 am

Panel #3
10:50 am – 11:50 am







The Importance of Transparency and Accountability in Medicine Procurement and Pricing

Prof. Saleh Bawazir,
(Moderator),
Professor of Clinical Pharmacy,
Department of Clinical Pharmacy,
King Saud University Pharma Consultant  Group,
KSA
Dr. Nick van Terheyden,
Chief Medical Officer,
Dell,
USA
Dr. Ahmed Alkhatib,
Head of Central Purchasing Department,
The Executive Board of the Health Ministries Council for GCC States
KSA
Mr. Muneer A. Baig,
Founder & CEO
SYSUSA, Inc.
USA
 

Pharmaceuticals are an integral component of a health care system; any weakness in governance of the pharmaceutical system negatively impacts health outcomes, especially in developing countries. It is believed that procurement based on the concept of an essential medicine list, together with transparency, leads to improved efficiency and access to medicines. However, transparency is only the first step; accountability and sustainability are also needed. Information systems create opportunities for transparency and openness through the disclosure of information and improve decision-making and efficiency along the medicine supply chain. With the lessons learned from experiences of many developing countries, technical guidance and tools developed by international agencies, a transparent, accountable, sustainable public procurement system is possible but high-level political commitment is needed to mandate and enforce the system.

PRAYER BREAK: 11:50 am – 12:20 pm

Panel #4
12:20 pm – 1:20 pm











Implementing Regional Guidelines Regarding Patient Treatment, Patient Safety and Cost Effective Healthcare Services

Dr. John A. Ulatowski,
(Moderator),
Interim CEO,
Johns Hopkins Aramco Healthcare,
KSA;
Vice President and Executive Medical Director,
Johns Hopkins Medicine International,
USA
Dr. Ahmed Alamry,
Executive Director of Quality and Patient Safety,
National Guard Health Affairs,
KSA
Dr. Sean V. Tavtigian,
Professor of Oncological Sciences;
Co-Leader,
Cancer Center Population Sciences Program,
Huntsman Cancer Institute,
University of Utah School of Medicine,
USA
Dr. Ali Mokdad,
Director of Middle Eastern Initiatives,
Professor of Global Health,
Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME),
University of Washington,
USA
Dr. Abdulelah Hawsawi,
Assistant Director,
Central Board for Accreditation of Healthcare Institutions (CBAHI)
KSA

National and regional quality and safety strategies regarding patient treatment, patient safety and costs include actions for building knowledge about quality problems and solutions, and actions for planning and implementing solutions at different levels of the health system in order to deliver effective healthcare services. These strategies must target the needs of the population at large, with emphasis on poor and marginalized (vulnerable) populations, which have poorer access to care. Effective quality and safety improvement is the result of many activities using systematic methods over a period of time. The development of tailored strategic plans and interventions plays an important role in creating conditions to stimulate and guide the various stakeholders to improve quality of performance and resource use. Establishing such strategies aims to institutionalize improvement work so that it survives particular governments.

BREAK: 1:20 pm – 1:30 pm

Panel #5
1:30 pm – 2: 30 pm








The Acceleration and Accreditation of the Saudi Healthcare Infrastructure Through the Collaboration of Private/Public Partnerships

Mr. Mazen Matar,
(Moderator),
President,
AECOM Arabia,
KSA
Mr. John Hicks,
Global Head of Healthcare and Science,
AECOM,
UK
Mr. Barry White,
Chief Executive Officer,
Scottish Futures Trust,
Scotland
Dr. Basmah Al-Buhairan,
Managing Director,
Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority, SAGIA,
KSA
Mr. Stephen P. Nash,
Partner,
Co-Leader, International Healthcare Practice Group,
Squire Patton Boggs,
USA

Despite rising investment and wider healthcare coverage, problems persist in the infrastructure of Saudi Arabia’s healthcare system. There are capacity gaps, a shortage of health professionals, and inconsistent quality of care. In some areas too many specialized programs exist, too few of which have the competencies for complex procedures. In addition there is the worsening rate of chronic, non communicable diseases, so-called lifestyle illnesses. What this means is that the Saudi healthcare model, in which the state shoulders most of the cost, is unsustainable. The aging of the region’s large young population will oblige even higher government spending. One means of tackling these problems is through public-private partnerships (PPPs). Around the world governments have successfully used PPPs to bring private companies into the state-dominated healthcare sector, to improve care and lower patient costs.

BREAK: 2:30 pm – 2:40 pm

Panel #6
2:40 pm – 3:40 pm









Building the Framework for Successful Healthcare Infrastructure Projects

Mr. Stephen P. Nash,
(Moderator)
Partner,
Co-Leader, International Healthcare Practice Group,
Squire Patton Boggs,
USA
Mr. Dennis l. Kogod,
President,
Healthcare Partners;
CEO,
DaVita Healthcare Partners International,
DaVita Healthcare Partners Inc.
USA
Dr. Brent James,
Chief Quality Officer & Executive Director,
Institute for Health Care Delivery Research,
Intermountain Healthcare,
USA
Dr. Basmah Al-Buhairan,
Managing Director,
Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority,
SAGIA,
KSA
Dr. Maha Almozaini,
Scientist,
King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center,
KSA
Dr. Mansour Alhajlah,
Legal Consultant,
Transformation Center,
Ministry of Health,
KSA

Worldwide, current demand for infrastructure is about $4 trillion in annual expenditures with a gap of at least $1 trillion every year. It has been well documented that public sector money alone cannot bridge this gap. Against these facts, infrastructure provides one of the most important areas for private sector alternative investment, particularly as this type of asset offers the necessary conditions for better balanced long-term investment strategies through deployment of public private partnerships. It is important that such projects be bankable and represent the best value for money in terms of delivery models. Much progress has been made in disseminating best practices for delivery models created through public-private partnerships -- which can offer a convenient way to access private sector capital and can also offer a clear advantage in transferring risk to the one party, amongst a number, that is most capable of managing it. Such a dedicated infrastructure asset class could also attract investors assessing their long-term portfolio strategies which, typically, are in good alignment with the lifetime of such operating assets.

These principles are equally important for countries looking to build or expand their social infrastructure (e.g., health and education). Moving from broad principles of worldwide application, to nation-specific considerations, to particular case studies, the speakers for this workshop will address the following topics:

  • Steps appropriate to a nation’s Mitigation of Political & Regulatory Risk in Infrastructure Projects – including thoughts on a current World Economic Forum report of the same name.
  • Thoughts on deploying a successful national PPP Program, with “lessons learned” from current efforts to structure renewed national PPP Programs.
  • Discussion of the next generation of healthcare PPPs – reallocating operating risks and responsibilities from public to private partners.
  • Discussion of a case study that has adapted population health management – and capitated payments – to work within a healthcare PPP.
  • Discussion of the place for public health within population health management.

END OF DAY
{tab 27 April 2016|mystyle2}

AGENDA TOPICS/ABSTRACTS - Wednesday 27 April 2016

Panel #7
8:30 am - 9:30 am










The Importance of the KSA National Newborn Screening Program and the Goal of Universal Coverage

Dr. Yazid Alshaikh,
Associate Professor,
Resear Chair Director,
Medical Genetics,
King Saud University,
KSA
Dr. Hanaa Banjar,
Pediatric Pulmonology,
King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre,
KSA
Prof. Mohsen Alhazmi,
Member,
Shura Council,
KSA
Prof. Zuhair Alhasan,
Consultant of Medical Genetics,
King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre;
Director, National Newborn Screening Program,
Ministry of Health
KSA

There is no doubt that the MENA region lags behind many other countries where neonatal screening is concerned. Overall, newborn screening (NBS) in the Arab region is developing slowly and faces many challenges. These challenges are not only infrastructural, but also political, ethical and logistical. The challenges include planning, leadership support, education, innovation, protocol or policy development, administration, evaluation and sustainability. Geographical challenges are substantial, as large distances and isolation may limit accessibility for screening the entire newborn population of the area. Development of sustainable financing, availability of formulas and other nutritional supplements for management are also met with difficulty. Some MENA countries have not begun NBS. Implementation of a pilot NBS program is their primary goal. These countries include Libya, Morocco, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen and Algeria. Other countries have completed pilot studies for at least one condition and anticipate expansion to national programs. These include Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Pakistan and Tunisia. The third group screen for at least one condition, primarily congenital hypothyroidism, and most screen for two or more conditions. These countries include Bahrain, Egypt, Palestinian Territory (Occupied), Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates. NBS is not only a test but also a comprehensive system of education, screening, follow-up, diagnosis, treatment or management and evaluation that must be institutionalized and sustained within public health systems.

BREAK: 9:30 am - 9:40 am

Panel #8
9:40 am - 10:40 am










The Need to Reduce Obesity, Smoking & Hypertension to Promote Public Health and Decrease Cost of Care

Prof. Lubna, Alansari,
(Moderator),
Member,
Shura Council,
Professor of Family Medicine,
KSA
Prof. Tawfiq Khoja,
Secretary General,
The Executive Board of Health Ministries' Council,
GCC
Prof. Assim A Alfadda, MD, FRCPC, FACP, MSc
Professor of Medicine, Endocrinology & Metabolism
Director, Obesity Research Center,
College of Medicine,
King Saud University,
KSA
Dr. Ali Mokdad,
Director of Middle Eastern Initiatives,
Professor of Global Health,
Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME),
University of Washington,
USA
Dr. Ebtisam Bakhsh,
Assistant Professor,
Medicine,
Princess Noura University,
KSA

Public health—the practice of preventing disease and promoting health—effectively targets environmental factors and health behaviors that contribute to chronic conditions. The health risk factors of physical inactivity, tobacco use and exposure and poor nutrition are the leading causes of chronic disease. Chronic diseases are the leading cause of death and disability globally and among the most costly—yet preventable. Almost one out of every two U.S. adults—107 million people—reported having at least one of six chronic illnesses: cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, diabetes or arthritis. Seven out of 10 deaths among Americans each year are from chronic diseases. Heart disease, cancer and stroke account for more than 50% of all yearly deaths. With even a small reduction in the prevalence of chronic disease, the combined health and productivity cost savings of prevention lead to a positive return on investment within a short time. Obesity, which can lead to heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and cancer, costs the U.S. $147 billion annually. By 2030, medical costs associated with obesity alone are expected to increase by at least $48 billion annually, with the annual loss in economic productivity totaling $390 billion to $580 billion. From 2000 to 2004, smoking cost the U.S. about $193 billion—nearly $96 billion in direct medical costs and $97 billion in lost productivity. In short, the five most costly and preventable chronic conditions cost the U.S. nearly $347 billion—30% of total health spending—in 2012.

BREAK: 10:40 am - 10:50 am

Panel #9
10:50 am - 11:50 pm




 




Meeting the Kingdom's Healthcare Workforce Training Needs

Dr. Brian J. Nickerson,
(Moderator)
Administrative Director,
Ichan School of Medicine,
Mount Sinai,
USA
 
Prof. Selwa Al-Hazzaa,
Shura Council Member,
Chairman and professor of Ophthalmology,
King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center,
Alfaisal University,
KSA
Prof. Mohamed Al Moamary,
VP for Development and Quality,
King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences,
Executive Director,
Medical Services,
National Guard Health Affairs,
KSA
Ms. Deborah K. Green,
Executive Vice President/Chief Innovation,
Global Services Officer,
AHIMA,
USA
Dr. Ahmed AbuAbah,
Chief Executive Officer,
King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz University Hospital,
Princess Nourah bint Abdulrahman University,
KSA

Building an effective Saudi workforce continues to present considerable regional challenges, including inadequate access to trained professionals. The first Saudi physician graduated in 1951 from a medical school in Egypt. As recently as 1970, there were only 1,172 physicians and 3,267 nurses in the country – almost all of them foreigners. Planning for a countrywide healthcare system began in 1971 with the development of successive five-year national health plans. The real expansion of the healthcare system, however, occurred between 1980 and 1990, when a large number of hospitals and primary health centers (PHCs) were built. For example, in the three-year period between 1985 and 1987, 65 new hospitals and 312 new PHCs were established. Consequently, by 1997, close to 2500 Saudi students were enrolled in medical schools at home or overseas The rate of growth slowed in the 1990s because of a relatively flat MOH budget that resulted in the suspension of plans for some large projects such as the King Fahad Medical City in Riyadh. However, the 1990s also saw notable growth in the private health sector which, by the end of the decade, accounted for approximately 15% to 20% of all healthcare visits and 19% of all hospital beds, and employed 28% of physicians and 19% of nurses in the country. In the twenty-first century, the number of healthcare facilities has continued to grow. That said, in the last two decades, serious efforts have been made to rapidly increase the supply of Saudi healthcare workers but the number of qualified healthcare professionals still lags the increase in patient care throughout the Kingdom.

Understandably, shortages, or even talk of shortages, can manipulate progress, creating problems for health industry executives who face the daily issues of recruiting and retaining the best talent. Yet because shortages have also been cyclical, short-term solutions have won out over long-term changes. Seeking solutions means understanding that while the challenges confronting nurse and physician shortages are very different, their roles and futures are starting to converge. Healthcare is a team sport: a dozen or more types of physicians and nurses can be involved in a single patient’s care, and the need for coordination and planning then becomes more imperative and complex. As a result, it’s not a matter of determining the mix of nurses and doctors to deliver efficient and effective care. Executives today must consider what kinds of nurses and doctors are needed, what tasks these clinicians are best educated to deliver, and how technology and lower-skilled workers can be used to supplement or replace them.

Therefore, as Saudi Arabia embarks on its laudable mission to expand the healthcare system and improve the well-being of its citizens, the need for creation of a sustainable and well-trained workforce is paramount. This expert panel will provide a probing discussion of potential strategies that may be crafted to more effectively meet this challenge. Specifically, the panel will focus attention upon 1) the broadening effectiveness of blended and on-line learning approaches, 2) bridging on site and US/Western based environments, 3) locating the "best fit" educational partners, 4) the benefits of strategic partnerships and consortia versus individual projects, and 5) providing culturally-relevant tools and knowledge.

PRAYER BREAK: 11:50 am - 12:20 pm

Panel #10
12:20 pm - 1:20 pm









 

A Lesson from US Healthcare System: Should the Saudi Government Provide Health Insurance Coverage?

Dr. Sami Alhabib,
(Moderator),
Assistant Professor,
Health Administration,
King Saud University,
KSA
Mr. Loay Nazer,
Founder & Chairman,
Nazer Group (Bupa Arabia),
KSA
Mr. Ahmed Amer,
Client & Partner Development,
United Healthcare Global,
USA
Mr. Muneer A. Baig,
Founder & CEO
SYSUSA, Inc.
USA

Like the US, Saudi Arabia has implemented mandatory health coverage for all expatriates. The resultant effect, essentially placing choice of provider into the hands of the individual, has increased the demand levels on the private sector. The Saudi Government is also expected to implement a similar rule for Saudi Nationals which would further add to the increasing demand for private healthcare services. Backed by new regulations, the health insurance market in Saudi Arabia is expected to experience a healthy growth rate. Health insurance Gross Written Premium (GWP) is expected to reach SAR 21.1 Billion (US$ 5.70 Billion) by the end of 2015, growing at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of around 19% during 2011-2015. And like the US, the Saudi Healthcare sector is structured to provide a basic platform of healthcare services to all, with specialized treatment facilities offered at some private and public hospitals. With an estimated population of 26 million residents and an annual growth rate of 2.2%, the Saudi Arabian insurance sector caters to a rapidly growing population. For this reason, the supply and related costs of healthcare insurance struggle to keep pace with the burgeoning population, a considerable financial concern that needs to be recognized/resolved by the Kingdom's MOH.

BREAK: 1:20 pm - 1:30 pm

Panel #11
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm







Developing Responsible Healthcare in the Kingdom’s Private/Public Schools: Grades K-12

Dr. Hisham Al Khashan,
(Moderator),
Undersecretary PHC,
Ministry of Health,
KSA
Dr. Scott McNabb,
Research Professor,
Emory University,
USA
Dr. Suliman Alshehri,
Director School Health,
Ministry of Health,
KSA
Dr. Lloyd Kolbe,
Emeritus Professor,
Indiana University,
USA

School health is increasingly being recognized as an important avenue for improving the health and well being of students, families, and communities. School health encompasses a broad range of categories including but not limited to health education, physical activity, nutritional environment, health services, physical environment, family engagement, and community involvement. With rising rates of non-communicable and behavioral diseases in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, there is a need to increase awareness of early preventative measures. K-12 children are especially susceptible to positive or negative health attitudes and behaviors. As such school leadership, administrators, teachers, staff, and families have a responsibility to develop lifelong, positive health-related attitudes and behaviors. Research shows participation in school breakfast and snack programs, physical education, and extracurricular activities is associated with better grades and improved test scores; this proves the interdependence of health and education. The workshop, “The Importance of Practicing Good Health in the Private and Public School System for Grades K-12” advocates for a comprehensive approach to school health in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The proposed panel, consisting of leading experts in the fields of health and education from the USA and Saudi Arabia, will explore the challenges of delivering high quality school health programs within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia as well as innovative solutions. The workshop will foster discussion and move the critical school health agenda forward.

BREAK: 2:30 pm - 2:40 pm

Panel #12
2:40 pm - 3:40 pm















 

Fundamentals of Medical Research: From Theory to Practice

Mr. Talat Z. Hafiz
(Moderator),
Secretary General, Media Committee & Banking Awareness,
Saudi Banks,
KSA
Dr. Anas Khan,
Assistant Professor, Emergency & Disaster Medicine,
King Saud University,
KSA
Mr. Abdelali Haoudi,
Head, Strategy, Research & Development,
King Abdullah International Medical Research Center,
KSA
Mr. Muneer A. Baig,
Founder & CEO
SYSUSA, Inc.
USA
Prof. Ahmed Bahammam,
Professor of Medicine,
King Saud University,
KSA

This panel will introduce the innovation process, design thinking, entrepreneurship, principles of process improvement, regulatory issues, patent law, and the market forces that impact the healthcare innovation process. It will also discuss the roles of entrepreneurs or organizations’ leaders to enable innovation to solve and advance health care by becoming aware of challenges to the quality of healthcare delivery; the opportunity for improving patient care and cost reductions; a process for identifying and prioritizing real clinical problems and opportunities for innovation; developing cross-disciplinary collaboration skills; and, leadership skills in advocating health systems change. This panel will also discuss the major challenges of healthcare delivery that innovator leaders and entrepreneurs face, including:



1. Access to "Know-How" & Networks
2. Organizational Expertise
3. Regulatory Barriers
4. Access to Funding & Capital
BREAK: 3:40 pm - 3:45 pm

Closing Address
3:40 pm - 3:45 pm





Its About the Information, Not the Technology


Ms. Deborah K. Green,
Executive Vice President/Chief Innovation,
Global Services Officer,
AHIMA,
USA


In this closing address, AHIMA’s Chief Innovation and Global Services Officer will bring perspectives on the need for focus digitization initiatives on the information versus the technology as the key to getting to a state of trust in our data and information. Focus on technology without adequate attention to the reasons for the technology has led to concerns regarding the reliability of data and information. Without a refocus on why and how we implement information technologies, we will compromise the safety and quality of care, handicap our transformation of healthcare delivery, and create barriers to improving the health of our populations.

CLOSING REMARKS

Closing Remarks
3:45 pm - 4:00 pm





 


Dr. John Duke Anthony,
Founding President & CEO,
National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations

 

In his 52nd year of studying and working on the Arab world, Dr. John Duke Anthony continues to examine ways to strengthen and expand the Arab – U.S. relationship. He continues his role as Founding President and CEO of the National Council on U.S. – Arab Relations to enhance awareness and appreciation of the need to strengthen and expand America’s relations with its strategic allies and working partners. A particular emphasis remains how best to further the goal of enhancing American knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of the unrivaled pivotal position and role of Saudi Arabia in the Arab countries, the Middle East, and the Islamic world.

END OF SAUDI-AMERICAN HEALTHCARE FORUM 2016 & CLOSING REMARKS
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